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STARS News Release

STARS promoting motorcycle injury prevention before Labour Day weekend

August 26, 2014

Alberta, August 26, 2014 – STARS air ambulance is asking motorists, and particularly motorcyclists, to take caution this Labour Day long weekend after responding to 46 serious motorcycle and dirt bike related incidents in Alberta in 2013. There were 31 incidents involving motorcycles and 15 involving dirt bikes. Five motorcycle incidents occurred during last year’s Labour Day long weekend alone.

“STARS’ air medical crews prepare for all types of missions,” said Mike Lamacchia, a flight paramedic and Vice President of Alberta Operations. “When responding to a motorcycle incident, we prepare for extensive trauma that will potentially require all of our advanced critical care training and knowledge.”

Fractures, head and spinal cord injuries, burns, and lacerations are some the devastating injuries that may be experienced by patients in a motorcycle related incident.

Background
• STARS air ambulance responded to 46 serious motorcycle and dirt bike incidents in 2013, including 31 involving motorcycles, and 15 involving dirt bikes.
• There were five motorcycle incidents during the last Labour Day long weekend alone.
• As of July 2014, or the mid-point of this year’s riding season, STARS had already responded to 34 motorcycle and dirt bike incidents, including 23 involving motorcycles and 11 involving dirt bikes.


Safety messages
• Personal protective equipment can help motorcycle riders to prevent or reduce injuries.
• Riding without protective gear is a risk never worth taking.
• Invest in a proper jacket, gloves, footwear and helmet.
• Motorcyclists do not have the protections afforded by larger vehicles, such as seatbelts, the vehicle’s outer frame, or an air bag.
• Patients ejected from vehicles have a greater chance of being fatally injured. Every high speed motorcycle collision involves a patient being ejected.
• Motorcycles are difficult to see due to their small size, and may be alongside motorists without their knowledge. Always shoulder check before changing lanes.
• Use extra caution during twilight hours, as this is when there is reduced visibility and more animals are on the roadways.
• Ensure motorcycles are properly maintained.

More information

Cam Heke
Manager, Media & Public Relations
Communications and External Affairs
STARS
1-866-966-8277
mediainfo@stars.ca